Concurrent Encoding of Precision and Prediction Error in Unfolding Auditory Patterns: Insights from MEG

Avatar
Poster
Voices Powered byElevenlabs logo
Connected to paper

Concurrent Encoding of Precision and Prediction Error in Unfolding Auditory Patterns: Insights from MEG

Authors

Hu, M.; Bianco, R.; Rodriguez Hidalgo, A.; Chait, M.

Abstract

Human listeners possess an innate capacity to discern patterns within rapidly evolving auditory sequences. Core questions, at the forefront of ongoing research, focus on the mechanisms through which these representations are acquired and whether the brain prioritizes or suppresses predictable sensory signals. Previous work, using fast sequences (tone-pips presented at a rate of 20Hz), revealed sustained response effects that appear to track the dynamic precision (predictability) of the sequence. Here we extend the investigation to slower sequences (4Hz), permitting the isolation of responses to individual tones. Stimuli were 50ms tone-pips, ordered into random (RND) and regular (REG; a repeating pattern of 10 frequencies) sequences; Two timing profiles were created: in \"fast\" sequences tone-pips were presented in direct succession (20 Hz); in \"slow\" sequences tone-pips were separated by a 200ms silent gap (4 Hz). Naive participants (N=22; both sexes) passively listened to these sequences, while brain responses were recorded using magnetoencephalography (MEG). Results unveiled a heightened magnitude of sustained brain responses in REG when compared to RND patterns. This manifested from three tones after the onset of the pattern repetition, even in the context of slower sequences characterized by extended pattern durations (2500ms). This observation underscores the remarkable implicit sensitivity of the auditory brain to acoustic regularities. Importantly, brain responses evoked by single tones exhibited the opposite pattern - stronger responses to tones in RND compared to REG sequences. The demonstration of simultaneous but opposing sustained and evoked response effects reveals concurrent processes that shape the representation of unfolding auditory patterns.

Follow Us on

0 comments

Add comment